Do semiconductors inherently digitize the sound?

Table of Contents

Abstract

What’s interesting to note is the random quantization of the pulse bursts (in a vacuum tube operated in ‘cold cathode’ mode). Does crystalline lattice semiconductor, operating a lower voltage due to direct surface contact and coupling, suffer similar quantization bursts of current flow?  Guitar amplifier legend Howard Dumble spoke of the “crystalline lattice” having an audible effect on sound quality.

 

Content

High-voltage induced break-down of metal lattice domain / molecular surface tension in cold-cathode-stripped vacuum tube / electron valve. Under 20,000 Volts acceleration potential, electrons apparently strip from the cold (un-heated) metal cathode in sporadic bursts (not any patterned or smooth flow) and presumably cause gamma radiation upon high-velocity impact with internal metal and glass parts. What’s interesting to note is the random quantization of the pulse bursts. Does crystalline lattice semiconductor, operating a lower voltage due to direct surface contact and coupling, suffer similar quantization bursts of current flow? Do semiconductors inherently digitize the sound?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yLSu_UjrcUA

 

 

On a macro scale, semiconductors themselves do not inherently digitize sound; instead, semiconductors are materials that have electrical conductivity between that of a conductor and an insulator. They are used in various electronic devices, including audio equipment, but their role in digitizing sound depends on the specific application and circuitry involved.

On a micro-scale, however, at the atomic level of a supposed highly-fractured (due to impurities) crystalline lattice, “digitization” may be commonplace.  Re-molten and pulled, or otherwise magnetically aligned and/or purified “domains” are the basis of audibly-recognized benefits in various products.  Monster Cable OFC comes immediately to mind.  Moreover, consequent to millions (trillions?) of microscopic “magnetic moments” are corresponding hysteretic inductive effects which surely degrade signal integrity.  Analogously: A river whose flow is otherwise silent sounds very different over rocks or falls.  The percentage of effect is a matter of scale and resolution.

In audio equipment, semiconductors such as transistors, integrated circuits (ICs), and digital signal processors (DSPs) are commonly used in analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) and digital-to-analog converters (DACs), which are the components responsible for converting between analog and digital signals.

Here’s how the process generally works:

1. **Analog-to-Digital Conversion (ADC)**: In an ADC, the analog signal (such as sound waves) is sampled at regular intervals and measured. This measurement is then represented as a series of binary numbers, which are digital representations of the original analog signal. Semiconductors play a crucial role in the circuitry of the ADC, particularly in amplifying, filtering, and processing the analog signal before conversion to digital.

2. **Digital-to-Analog Conversion (DAC)**: In a DAC, the digital signal is converted back into an analog signal. Semiconductors are also used in DAC circuitry to process and amplify the digital signal before conversion. The resulting analog signal can then be amplified further and sent to speakers or other output devices to reproduce sound.

So, while semiconductors themselves do not inherently digitize sound, they are essential components in the electronic circuitry used for analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog conversion processes in audio equipment. These conversions allow analog audio signals to be processed, stored, and transmitted digitally, enabling various digital audio applications such as recording, playback, and transmission over digital networks.

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